Tag Archives: womens’ cycling

Cyclocross is for idiots

Here is a brief history of my experience of riding off-road:

  • Zipping across the grass at Hove Park  to use the public toilets after too much Leffe whilst watching the racing on a Friday evening.
  • Pushing an old bike up a big hill in Woodingdean, whilst swearing incessantly at my then-boyfriend whose stupid idea it was to go that way.
  • Slightly drunken 2am short-cuts across parks in Brighton.
Hove Park before a race

Hove Park before a race

Now that you know what an expert I am, let’s talk about all the top-spec bikes I’ve spent thousands on.

I’ve ridden 4 bikes in my adult life:

  • Lady Bike. Inherited from my mother. Used for shopping (it had a basket), and occasional seafront spins. Stolen from outside my flat in 2011.
  • Rust Bucket. Donated by a friend after my other bike got nicked. It didn’t much like changing gear, and eventually ended it’s days on that hill in Woodingdean.
  • Claud! My first proper road bike and the best thing that ever happened to me (no, really). Lover of Sussex roads.
  • Annie the Single Speed. A long term loan from my favourite bike mechanic. Rarely leaves the city.

So, as you can see, I’m well equipped for a foray into the muddy world of cyclocross……

Having been to my share of CX races as a spectator or helper, I decided it was probably time I gave it a go myself. There’s something about the atmosphere around cyclocross racing that appeals to me far more than road racing. Yes, it’s a proper competitive sport, and at a high level there’s nothing particularly light-hearted about it. But with the existence of events like Muddy Hell,  City Cross and races like White Chalk Hills CX, it’s obvious that there’s a really fun side to the sport. (Also, there often seems to be beer.)

Riding Cyclocross really is the best fun you can have on a bike. Road riding is all about style, finesse and panache, the history and the suffering. Cyclocross is about the fun, suffering, mud, friends and beer.

Mark Tearle, after Muddy Hell 2012

White Chalk Hills CX

White Chalk Hills CX (photo by Gavin Peacock)

White Chalk Hills CX (Photo by Gavin Peacock)

White Chalk Hills CX (Photo by Gavin Peacock)

The perfect opportunity presented itself in the form of a women’s CX rider development session, at Herne Hill. The session is aimed at novices, and you can even hire a CX bike as part of the cost of the day, which is only £6. BARGAIN. I booked in with my friend Monika, taking comfort in the fact that she is also a total newbie.

The ‘cross course at Herne Hill is being developed at the moment – and it’s starting to look brilliant. Whilst they’re still digging bits of it the mud is more churned up than usual, and thanks to the rain we’ve had recently the mud is also more….muddy. Getting muddy doesn’t bother me – in fact I really like it – but keeping my bike upright in the mud does worry me. Especially when the bike you’ve borrowed doesn’t really fit you, and the brakes are mostly there for decoration.

I am always a bag of nerves when it comes to new things. If you asked the me from 2 years ago if she would like to go on a CX training session, she would have laughed loudly, told you to piss off, and poured a gin (I will probably still do the third one of those). The 2013 edition of me is a bit better at trying stuff, especially if it’s on two wheels, but still gets just as scared.

It felt completely alien and unnatural riding a bike in thick mud, over bumps, down slippery slopes and through trees. After 5 minutes I considered running away and giving up (no change there). Then I thought about how terrified I used to get going down fast hills on my road bike, and that after doing it lots of times it stopped being scary and started being the best fun ever.

image

This mud is sponsored by Morvelo.

The first time around the course I stopped and pushed my bike countless times. “A BUMP? I CAN’T RIDE OVER THAT!”. The second time I got off the bike slightly less. I even rode a medium sized bumpy-humpy-jumpy-thing and squealed with excitement when I didn’t fall off. By the third time, I was no less scared, but actually starting to enjoy bits. The concentration involved in staying upright is far, far more than when riding on the road. I’m glad there were no cameras, because I dread to think what kind of faces I was pulling.

There is one very steep section on the course, it’s only a couple of metres, but it’s short, sharp and slippery in equal measure. Going up it was fine…with little to no grace I’d jump off the bike and run up it. Then the instructor said we were going to go around the course in the other direction, which meant going down it. I will save any build up or suspense – I didn’t ride down it. I was too terrified. Next time I will be courageous. Maybe. Monika rode down it and ended up on the floor. She is a braver woman than me, and I salute her and her very muddy arse.

My muddy arse. (Not muddy enough. Must try harder.)

My muddy arse. (Not muddy enough. Must try harder.)

I was very aware of how painfully slowly I was travelling 90% of the time. Had I been going faster I wouldn’t have had to get off the bike so much – hitting thick sections of mud when you’ve got some momentum going is always going to be easier than dragging the bike through it at walking pace. So, I need to get braver, which means going faster, which means riding more of the course, which means having more fun. Sounds simple enough – I best get practising.

Today I ache all over. It’s the good kind of ache, though – the kind that reminds you that you didn’t spend your whole weekend on the sofa.

So, in conclusion: cyclocross is utterly stupid. It’s really hard, and really scary, and you’d have to be an idiot to do it. And I think I’m going to do it again very soon.

mudhernehill

Me and my (not very) trusty steed.

 

(There is a second women’s cx session at Herne Hill in December, as well as a men’s one. There are details here, if you want to borrow a bike then you need to book in advance.)

Ride Like A Girl

We ride like girls. Try to keep up, yeah?

These reflective musettes were inspired by world champions, bike messengers, punks, losers, friends and every other girl who’s ever ridden a bike.

Designed by me – hand made and printed in London by the ever-awesome Mon, Ren and Esther at House of Astbury.

Each one is a teeny bit different, they’re totally DIY – just the way we like it.

They’re in the shop now, and shipping on Monday.

The bag

Shiny!

Burgundy version coming soon...

Burgundy version coming soon…

Twenty minutes with Jo Tindley

On Friday I went up to London for the team launch of Matrix Race Academy. I had the pleasure of talking to Jo Tindley for a while about her place on the team.

WITH PERMISSION OF ANDY WHITEHOUSE

WITH PERMISSION OF ANDY WHITEHOUSE

Jo Tindley joins Matrix Race Academy for her second season back after 5 years away from racing. In 2012 Jo finished fifth in her first race and then went on to win her next two at Thruxton before taking 10th place in her first National Series Road Race. Last Spring Jo rode the Johnson Health Tech Tour, the Women’s division of the Halford Tour Series, and finished the series seventh overall, finishing second in the sprinter’s competition – just one point off the lead.

Jo is looking to have a big season as part of the Matrix Race Academy. I chat to her about the world of women’s racing and what it’s like to balance her cycling career with four jobs.

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What is your day-to-day lifestyle like? Do you have much time for anything but cycling?

We [the team] spend a lot of time together. I’ve got four jobs – all shift work. I’m constantly working! I don’t really have time to go off and do other things unless it’s a race.

How do you cope with balancing your jobs and cycling? Is it difficult?

I was working all through the Winter, it was horrible. I was on the bike at 5 or half 4 in the morning through the middle of the Winter with all these lights on and stuff – it’s changing now, and I’m down to three jobs…I’m slowly petering them off so I’ve got enough to earn money through the season but still have commitment to the team. At the minute I’m coping fine. Beforehand when I was a junior and an under 23 I struggled, even just with school stuff. But now I manage everything really well. I want to be a bike rider, I want to race – so I’ve made sacrifices. I’ve got rid of my car and I ride to all my jobs. So instead of going to work all day, coming home and thinking “oh god, I’ve got to train now”, I’m like – well, I’ve done two hours training because I’ve ridden there and back. I fit everything in – everything is about cycling.

If you were a male cyclist in the same position, do you think you’d still have to work those jobs or could you make it work full time as a cyclist?

I don’t know. Personally, I think it’s a lot harder for men. You’ve got to be performing and you’ve got to be doing really well.

Is that just because there’s more competition in the male sport?

Yeah, that’s it. It’s a different league, you can’t really compare it to the same. I think there are more opportunities for men. But, because of the Olympics, women’s cycling is going in the right direction. I’m on the road commission for British Cycling, and I’ve seen the great developments that are coming through. From where I’ve come from as a Junior, there was nothing. There were no races – you’d have 30 women turn up, now you’ve got 80. It’s not going to be long before women are thought of as the same. It might not be until the next Olympics, but it’s on it’s way. We’re getting more credit, things are changing, and Stef [Wyman, team manager] is doing a fantastic job. This team…it’s going to be good this year.

Obviously you love cycling, but are you a fan of the sport? Do you follow any specific riders or teams? Does it interest you to watch races?

No, not really, I’m very single minded and I want to ride my bike. I’m not really that bothered by what everyone else is doing, it’s none of my business and I can’t be bothered unless I’m in the race with them. If I get time I will watch races, like the Tour de France and the Tour of Britain. I wouldn’t say I’m a massive cycling geek…I don’t buy Cycling Weekly, I don’t look at the BC site. The only person I really follow is Mark Cavendish: ‘cause I just think he’s cool.

You started racing at the age of 12. When you were a junior were you very aware of the fact you were a girl, did it hinder you at all or did you just get on with it?

Back then being a female you were a second-class citizen – this was 2002, 2003 sort of time. There wasn’t much opportunity for women to race and there was never a tour series or anything like that. You get stuck with that stigma of being a girl: you’re not strong enough, you can’t ride a bike very well. As a junior, I always rode with the men so in my eyes I rode like a man and I got treated like a bloke. You’ve just got to get on with it, it is a male-orientated sport, and that’s probably never really going to change. Yes, there’s a divide, obviously, but it’s getting there. I think that everything that’s happened in the last 5 years is so positive, it’s just brilliant.

It does seem to be the case that women’s cycling is on the up. I’ve just got my 4th cat license and have a diary full of women’s races, but I know that just a few years ago that wouldn’t have been possible. It seems the sport is getting more popular and receiving more credit that it ever has before. Why do you think that is? Is it just down to the Olympics, or are people’s attitudes just changing over time?

I think the whole build up of having the home Olympics is the main thing…the women’s road race was just spot on – you couldn’t have written that any better. That’s how it started…but it’s the whole build up, and everyone putting all this funding into sport, I think that’s what’s done it. I think probably the Olympics was the main catalyst…how well Lizzie did and how well the girls did on the track…people have realised that actually you can still be girly.

So do you think it makes a big difference having feminine role models in the sport?

It makes a massive difference. Back when I started no one ever had their nails done, whereas now they’re all getting that stuff. That’s not me, but it’s all part of it. I think that’s what really appeals to the girls, that they’re good bike riders but can still be glamorous. The whole stigma has changed, and it’s just going to get better.

Do you know much about the #fanbackedwomenscycling initiative that Stef and the team are involved with? What are your thoughts on it?

I think it’s an absolutely fantastic idea. All the reports I’ve had from these race training sessions…have been brilliant. It’s another way of finding new talent to come through. I’ll be a bit blunt…I understand [beginners] have got to start somewhere, but I don’t want them starting in my race. Giving the 4th cats their own races is a brilliant idea and has made such a difference to our racing.

Matrix RA are supporting the Bedford 3 Day in May. Do you think there are enough women’s races in the UK? I do. I mean, I race a lot with the men so it doesn’t really bother me, I’ll just go out with the men. But I think there are plenty. Bedford’s going to be great this year.

What races are in the diary, and which are you most excited about? This season I’m very excited about the Johnsons Health Tech tour again, I would like to wear the sprinters jersey again and also have a stage win. Another race I’m looking forward to is the National Crit Championships and the Road Champs. I also hope that we get a chance to ride as a team in Europe in some stage races.

What are your goals for the season? What are you most looking forward to and what do you want to achieve?

What I’m most looking forward to is working as a team. I had a great come back year racing with VC St Raphael, they were an amazing help, but I am looking forward to riding for a more structured team. [Matrix RA] have got some of the top girls in the UK – whatever my role will be, it will be done properly.

My goals: just to keep progressing forward in my sport and getting better and better all the time. Ultimately I would like to turn pro one day so this to me is a stepping stone. The opportunities are there, I’ve just got to grab them.

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You can follow Jo on Twitter at @jltindley and follow the team’s progress at @onthedrops

 

Team - Matrix Launch - With Permission of Guy Collier

WITH PERMISSION OF GUY COLLIER

Matrix Race Academy launch

Say the words ‘cycling team launch’ and what comes to mind? Cyclists in their team kit, stood in a line, all matching hairstyles and fake smiles. There’s nothing wrong with the traditional team launch, but…yawn. We’ve seen it all a thousand times. So I was pretty excited to be involved in what promised to be a day like no other with the Matrix Race Academy on Friday.

Stef Wyman, Team Manager of Matrix RA and a champion for women’s cycling, was keen to create a day that would be interesting and fun for all involved, as well as creating a social media buzz. I think it’s safe to say that the aim was achieved.

Starting the day at Vulpine HQ

The day started bright and early for me – a 7.30am train (an unearthly hour for a Brighton freelancer) whisked me to Vulpine HQ in London. A big green ‘V’ told me I was in the right place and I was greeted by the lovely Jools (aka Lady Velo, and Vulpine’s sales manager), who was clearly just as giddy as me about the day ahead. A gradual stream of writers and photographers arrived, and of course the team themselves, along with manager Stef Wyman and European CX Champ Helen Wyman, who is a mentor to the younger riders on the team.

Much slurping of coffee, munching of croissants and introducing of friends later, the team took some time to drool over the Vulpine clothes and choose what they wanted to wear for their photos. I may have also tried on a women’s merino jersey for size. Important business research, you understand.

Whilst the photographers worked their magic I took some time to admire the new team kit. I was more than a little excited about the #fanbackedwomenscycling logo which I designed featuring on the kit. If you don’t already know about #fbwc, go do your reading, it’s a brilliant initiative that the team are backing, and the force behind some excellent training sessions for female novice racers like myself.

New season Matrix RA jersey, featuring the #fanbackedwomenscycling logo

The On The Drops girls liked their new Vulpine caps

I had the pleasure of stealing the fantastic Jo Tindley, a new Matrix RA member for 2013, away from the camera for 20 minutes to chat about cycling and her involvement in the team. Each rider chatted to a different writer, another way to insure a bunch of different perspectives and angles on the day and the team.

You can read my interview with Jo here.

Team issue trainers? Yes please.

After lunch we all set off in different directions accross London. We trooped off in three’s – one rider, one writer, one photographer. Where we went was completely up to us (Sarah Connolly took Harriet Owen to the zoo..) in the hope that at the end of the day we would have a variety of unique photos which would reflect the individual personalities of the women that make up the team. Awesome plan, I thought. Myself, Jo Tindley and photography Andy Woodhouse headed off into the quirky lanes near Old Street for our photos. Check out Andy’s set of snaps here.

Jessie’s photoshoot with Guy Collier

No bikes?! Jo isn’t too pleased about that.

Everyone met back up Look Mum No Hands for the evening launch. It wasn’t long before the cafe was full to the brim with people – the staff had to remove the furniture to make space for us all. Belgian beer, bikes, lots of familiar faces..and a whole bunch of new ones.

As well as Matrix RA, we also heard from Stef about #fanbackedwomenscycling, the launch of London Women’s Cycle Racing league and the Bonita women’s team. I could just about hear the team presentation over the buzz of the cafe!

What a day. Thanks everyone: I had a ball, and I feel more inspired than ever to support the awesome sport that is women’s cycling.

Team Presentation at Look Mum No Hands

Massive good luck vibes to the whole team for the season ahead – not that they need it, these girls have got serious talent.

Follow the team on Twitter: @onthedrops

Pedal to freedom.

The bicycle…has been responsible for more movement in manners and morals than anything since Charles the Second. Under its influence, wholly or in part, have wilted chaperones, long and narrow skirts, tight corsets, hair that would come down, black stockings, thick ankles, large hats, prudery and fear of the dark; under its influence, wholly or in part, have blossomed weekends, strong nerves, strong legs, strong language, knickers, knowledge of make and shape, knowledge of woods and pastures, equality of sex, good digestion and professional occupation—in four words, the emancipation of women.

John Gallsworthy

I am going to ride my bike today. Not far – but I will ride in the rain on the seafront, in my jeans and trainers. I will ride to say thank you to my sisters who fought for my equality, and to celebrate that I can wear trousers. Little things, we might be tempted to think, but things which are a reminder of how far we have come.

Let’s keep pedalling until every woman and girl has the equal rights she deserves.

Today is International Women’s Day.

 

Come race with me…

Team ASL360 are on the look out for some more female riders. This makes me very happy for lots of reasons:

1) The more women riding bikes, the happier I am.

2) There need to be more opportunities for women to race, and this is one!

3) ASL360 is a small, well organised team with brilliant sponsors. So this is a great opportunity.

4) There’s a possibility that I’ll no longer be the only member of the team with nail polish to match her kit (although I’m sure the guys would look fetching)

Team Launch at the London Bike Show       (Photo © Klickchick Photography)

Currently the team is made up of Juniors; based in Scotland, and seniors; based in Sussex. Members vary from me, a newbie 4th Cat who hasn’t even done her first race yet, to guys who’ve been racing most of their life. Three ASL360 Juniors recently took 1st, 2nd and 3rd place on the podium for their race at the IG London Nocturne, at the London Bike Show. The diversity in the team makes it a pleasure to be a part of.

ASL360 is a company with cyclist safety at it’s core. That’s why they were at the London Bike Show with us last month.

Team ASL360 is the brain child of John Powell, the Sales Exec at ASL Vision – the company that designed and developed the ASL360 Surround View Camera system.

The team was formed because of a long standing passion for cycling and a desire to create awareness around ASL360SV. A system which minimises blind spots on any vehicle, including HGV’s, and so helps protect vulnerable road users such as cyclists.

As our team knows only too well, 53% of cyclists killed by trucks and large vehicles are crushed by them turning left – a renowned blind spot which this system addresses. If we can dramatically reduce the number of such incidences then we can increase public confidence in cycling and encourage more people to use this fun and sustainable means of transport.

Indoor Crit at the IG London Nocturne.    (Photo © Klickchick Photography)

If you answer ‘yes’ to the following statements, you ought to think about getting involved:

- You are a woman.

- You love cycling.

- You currently race, or want to start racing this year.

- You live close-ish to Lewes, in East Sussex (we have riders from Brighton, Horsham, Scaynes Hill, Hailsham…) Rides start there on Sundays, and it’s where we get together for team meetings.

If you think you might like to join Team ASL360, or want to find out a bit more about the team, feel free to contact me, or email John Powell directly at this address: teamasl360@gmail.com

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Team Sponsors:

 

We all shave our legs…

We all shave our legs, but that is where the equality stops.

You’ve probably heard a bit about the problems faced by female pro-cyclists. If you follow me on twitter, you certainly will have heard me talk about it. Women’s races have lower prize funds than men’s races, female riders are often unpaid, and many riders have to pay for their own transport to races. Here are some facts for you:

The first prize for the Chrono des Nations is €5785 for Elite Men. Elite Women? €379. The women’s race is shorter – but they still race 43% of the distance for a prize equal to 6.6% of the men’s prize!

In the UK, there have been only three women’s road races on TV all year; the Olympics road race, the UCI World Championships and, very briefly, the Halford’s Tour Series. Compared to men’s races that is an embarrassingly small amount of coverage.

The ProTour men are paid $264,000 on average a year. Marianne Vos, Ranked the World’s number 1 female elite road cyclist – is estimated to be paid $60,000 a year.

There is no minimum wage for female cyclists set out by the UCI. Men have a minimum wage of €30,000.

And to prove it isn’t just road racing that faces these kinds of gender differences: For all the Trials World Cup events the UCI has a minimum prize money amount of €3’336 for Elite/Junior men, compared to €590 for women.

Several female cyclists have spoken out recently about their disillusionment with the situation as it stands. Emma Pooley is the first person to come to my mind, as she has spoken this year about the possibility of giving up her cycling career. These were some of her words to Cycling News in January:

Frankly it’s a bit depressing that year after year you see teams and riders disappearing. All the while you see the governing body regulating saddle angles and what colour overshoes you’re allowed to wear. They could be doing more. …It’s a hard climate…I appreciate that but it’s a lot less to run a women’s team. You can do that on less than a quarter of what some men are on.

Marianne Vos, World Champion, spoke out about the lack of a minimum salary for female riders:

I think we all do as much for the sport as the men do…Of course, it’s a younger sport than the men’s sport, but it’s getting more and more professional and with a minimum salary it can only be more professional.

Ina-Yoko Teutenberg of Germany had something to say on the matter of minimum salaries too:

I think that’s total bullshit… We’ve seen in the last number of years that it’s getting more and more professional. The level is getting harder… We’re living in the 21st century so there should be equal rights for everybody.

I can think of only two reasons why anyone would think that the current situation with women’s cycling is not grossly unfair. The first: women do not deserve equal opportunities and rights to men. If you fall into that category, then I am not going to even attempt to win you over. The second reason: women’s cycling is not as professional, popular or developed as men’s cycling. I have marginally more sympathy if you fall into the second category. It is true that the history is not there like it is for men’s racing (the reasons for that could fill another whole post), but we cannot allow that to stop the sport from progressing to a level playing field.

The important thing is, that whatever the history, women’s cycling right now is incredibly exciting. The sport has had a fantastic year. In case you had forgotten…

The Olympic Road Race, London 2012.

The Olympic Road Race, London 2012. GB’s Lizzie Armitstead, shown centre, went on to take the Silver. First time I ever screamed at a sport event on the telly.

Marianne Vos, Olga Zabelinskaya and Lizzie Armitstead head the Olympic Road Race.

Marianne Vos after winning the World Championships.

Marianne Vos (Netherlands) on the podium with Silver medalist Rachel Neylan (Australia) and Bronze medalist Elisa Longo Borghini (Italy) at the Worlds.

World Championships Junior Women’s Road Race. Lucy Garner wins World Title for the 2nd time, Irene Brustad takes 2nd and Anna Zita Maria Stricker in 3rd.

The talent is there, that is very clear. I believe that the supporters are there too. We need to make it clear to potential sponsors, the UCI, British Cycling and everyone else, that there is a massive fan-base for women’s cycling, and that the sport deserves equal attention to the men’s.

Throwing money at the problem will probably help to some extent, but that is unlikely to happen, and won’t help in the long term. What is needed is grassroots change. It’s not going to happen overnight, but I’m optimistic that we will get there. This is where you come in!

Watch women’s cycling. Noisily.

Go to the races if you can. When you’re there, make lots of noise. Hell, you could even make a banner. Drag all your friends along – they will love it! When it isn’t televised, write to the broadcasters and tell them that it should be. When it is televised, watch it, enjoy it, and tell everyone how bloody fantastic it is. Annoy all your Twitter followers by going on about it. Yell “THIS IS BRILLIANT!” at the cat in a particularly exciting moment. Blog about it…

Support #fanbackedwomensteam  

Back in early September, Stefan Wyman (director of Matrix Fitness – Prendas Women’s pro cycling team) wrote an article for cyclismas.com on the Role of Fans in Women’s Cycling. As well as encouraging general support for the sport, he mentioned the idea of a Fan Backed Women’s Team. “Is there the support for this kind of venture? Who knows?  You tell me.” It turns out there is.

Dave Smith (former Olympic Coach and sports performance advisor) tweeted in response to Stef’s article, saying he would pledge £100 toward a women’s team if 500 others could also make the pledge. Soon momentum built and #fanbackedwomensteam was becoming a popular topic on Twitter, with 200 people pledging to be involved in just over a week. “Not all of us have £100 to pledge” I hear you cry! I fell into that category, so I messaged Stef to suggest that I would be happy to pledge a skill, rather than cash. After an exchange of emails I ended up designing a logo for #fanbackedwomensteam. If you want to help, whether it be with cash or with your time, expertise or resources, then you can pledge your support via Twitter using the #fanbackedwomensteam hash-tag. You can read more about the idea as it stands here.

A Fan Backed Women’s Team is starting to look like a reality – something which I think is incredibly exciting, and goes to prove that there is a whole lot of support for the sport. There is no quick fix for all the problems facing women’s cycling, but this is a bloody good place to start. So spread the word, and get involved.

Ride your bike…

At the end of the day, all of this is for the love of cycling, and we shouldn’t lose sight of that. The more of us there are riding bicycles, the more voices there are for cycling as a whole and therefore for women’s cycling. We’ve got nothing to lose from getting more people on bikes!

I have only starting following women’s cycling this year, but I now fully intend on making up for lost time. And I think you should, too.

 

 

Thanks due to John Orbea (@Cyclopunk) for helping me out on some of the facts

Credit for Olympic photos to Alexander Baxevanis and massive thanks to Bart Hazen for the World Championship photos.

Day 30 – Cycletta Brighton

For the final day of 30 days of biking I took part in the 80k route of Cycletta Brighton. I’m going to update this with a proper review of the ride, but I am having an insanely busy couple of days, so have not yet had the chance to write anything.

Here are some photos until I update this post tomorrow.

Ok, so I never updated this – sorry! You can read my review of the ride on the Cyclosport website, here.